Fri. Jun 22nd, 2018

6 Landmarks You Must See When in Rome

Rome is one of Europe’s most historically rich cities, with a number of famous and distinctive landmarks that can be easily accessed by visitors. Here are just seven of the most important sights to see in the city of Rome.

Capitoline Museums

Capitoline Museums

These museums were designed in 1536 by legendary artist Michelangelo and took over 400 years to be completed. The museums are located in a scenic spot at Piazza del Campidoglio atop Capitoline Hill. The architecture alone is worth a visit, but the Museums’ collections are also quite intriguing, featuring a variety of ancient statues and jewelry and restored art from multiple periods of European history.

The Vatican

The Vatican

Even if you’re not a Catholic, you’ll still find a lot of fascinating history to explore in The Vatican, the unique sovereign state within the city of Rome from which the Roman Catholic Church operates. It’s the home of the pope, and his Apostolic Palace contains one of the world’s most famed artworks, the fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, painted painstakingly over four years by Michelangelo. The Vatican is home to many other beautiful churches and buildings as well, including the enormous St. Peter’s Basilica, whose dome was also designed by Michelangelo.

The Colosseum

The Colosseum

The Colosseum probably attracts the most tourism of any Roman landmark, and for good reason. The massive structure was one of the world’s largest amphitheaters when it was built in 72 AD, a testament to the awe-inspiring size and influence of the Roman empire. It was once home to gladiator battles, public executions, and other less gruesome spectacles. Today, it still stands as one of Rome’s most impressive feats of architecture and destinations for travel.

 

Campo De’ Fiori

Campo De’ Fiori

Young people congregate in this rectangular square at night to party, while it functions as a bustling marketplace during the daylight hours. It’s a great place to buy fresh produce, fish, or meat in the morning, and the square is lined with bars, restaurants, and cafes at which to enjoy dinner or have a drink during your trip.

The Catacombs of St. Domitilla

The Catacombs of St. Domitilla

If you’re a fan of horror movies or creepy things in general, the ancient Catacombs of St. Domitilla are one of the most genuinely unsettling attractions in Rome, or all of Europe for that matter. You enter through a church constructed in the 4th century and explore a labyrinthine series of graves, including real ancient bones and beautiful, if uncanny, artwork. You can arrange to tour the catacombs, which extend for 10 miles underneath the city, for 20 minutes to an hour-long enough to absorb some unleaded nightmare fuel.

 

The Pantheon

The Pantheon

The Pantheon was a temple built in tribute to the mythological gods of Rome in 126 AD and is one of the most well-preserved buildings from that era in any part of the world. It’s since been converted to a Roman Catholic church, but the 2,000-year-old architecture remains intact, including a massive concrete dome and eight iconic granite Corinthian columns that extend across the front of the building.